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Torsional Forces on Stationary Gears?

Old 01-28-06, 01:52 PM
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Torsional Forces on Stationary Gears?

Hey guys/gals,

Does anyone have any data regarding the torsional forces acting upon the stationary gear? My assumption would be that the force varies depending on the weight of the rotor, type of seals used, any coatings used, etc... so please if you have this info, could you specify the exact setup of the engine?

Thank you!
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Old 02-06-06, 11:58 AM
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Maybe you could back-calculate it from the size and strength and bolt pattern of the screws that retain the stationary gears to the end housings.
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Old 02-07-06, 09:18 AM
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someone on the forums gave me this link to help answer some of my questions. www.rotaryrefs.net goto the misc. rotary books section click on the book labeled rotary engine and then go to page 25 in the book page 30 of the pdf and that shoud be the info your looking for. hope this helps!

sincerely,
Sean M
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Old 02-07-06, 11:17 AM
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Since the gear is a part of the mechanism the causes the force on the combustion face of the rotor to 'crank' into rotational motion, I think the loading on it is mainly related to the combustion pressure and rotor size. Since for most rotary engines the rotor is the same size, then the combustion pressure is the big difference. So I would start by assuming the load on the gear is directly proportional to engine torque output.

The dynamic loads on the gear must also be significant, and would depend on rotor weight, inertia, drag, etc. But how much is that capable of changing?

Dave
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Old 02-07-06, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by dgeesaman
Since the gear is a part of the mechanism the causes the force on the combustion face of the rotor to 'crank' into rotational motion, I think the loading on it is mainly related to the combustion pressure and rotor size. Since for most rotary engines the rotor is the same size, then the combustion pressure is the big difference. So I would start by assuming the load on the gear is directly proportional to engine torque output.

The dynamic loads on the gear must also be significant, and would depend on rotor weight, inertia, drag, etc. But how much is that capable of changing?

Dave
I found the section discussing stationary gear design in the Yamamoto book (it was book page 45 in my copy), and it's loaded with good info.

Seal type, rotor coating, would seem to be way too small to make a difference in any of this.

The thing I want to know is: if this question isn't just theoretical, why can't you start with the stock stationary gear design and adjust it according you your engine changes? What situation has you redesigning this gear?

Dave
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Old 02-12-06, 06:10 PM
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Check page 24 of the Yamamoto book
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Old 02-14-06, 08:26 AM
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Wow check out how the forces just skyrocket after 7K rpm.
And Fig 3.18 has convinced me to run both plugs.
I would love to see new graphs that use the lighter Renesis rotors.

Last edited by Travis R; 02-14-06 at 08:30 AM.
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