General Rotary Tech Support Use this forum for tech questions not specific to a certain model year

E-shaft bolt removal in car

Old 04-01-19, 08:37 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (4)
 
lawless's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Crestview, Florida
Posts: 325
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
E-shaft bolt removal in car

So my front cover on my FD is leaking oil. I found the gasket pushed out on one side. I had some trouble getting the E-shaft bolt out with engine still in car. I made a tool and thought I'd share how I did it.

I found an old oem pulley i had laying around and welded a pipe to it. I'm not a welder so don't judge the welds. It worked like a charm so I figured I'd share my solution.
lawless is offline  
Old 04-01-19, 09:10 AM
  #2  
Rotary Madness
iTrader: (2)
 
rxtasy3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Spartanburg, SC
Posts: 7,546
Likes: 0
Received 64 Likes on 60 Posts
be sure to wedge a piece of 2x4 or something between the seat and clutch pedal keeping it pushed in to keep pressure on the front bearing stack so none of it falls down when removing the hub. looks like someone installed one of those aluminum thermal pellets. hope it all goes back together with no issues.
rxtasy3 is offline  
Old 04-01-19, 10:39 AM
  #3  
Rotorhead for life
iTrader: (1)
 
Pete_89T2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Elkton, MD
Posts: 355
Likes: 0
Received 34 Likes on 28 Posts
Originally Posted by rxtasy3 View Post
be sure to wedge a piece of 2x4 or something between the seat and clutch pedal keeping it pushed in to keep pressure on the front bearing stack so none of it falls down when removing the hub. looks like someone installed one of those aluminum thermal pellets. hope it all goes back together with no issues.
^Actually the above advice doesn't apply to an FD, which is what the OP is working on. Below is the correct procedure, which I highlighted in red, courtesy of the MazdaTrix website:

Before we wade through this FAQ, the way to prevent the problem from happening in the first place is to, (BEFORE! you loosen the bolt):

1) If the engine is in the car (this DOES NOT APPLY for 93-95s) do something to wedge the clutch pedal down meaning a 24 or something like it, holding the pedal down and wedged against steering wheel or front of the seat.

2) If the engine is out of the car, set it with the flywheel down, front pulley up, the whole time you are working on the front of the engine. Do not roll the engine horizontal until the front bolt is tightened.

3) For 93-95s you need to do something to wedge the flywheel forward easiest we have done is a small piece of wood up through the inspection plate on the bottom of the bellhousing. With the wood between the pressure plate and the bellhousing. Do something to hold it there, because if you rotate the engine while trying to get the bolt loose, the wood will fall out.

What any of the above steps will do is to hold the rear torrington bearing in place against the thrust plate keeping it from dropping out of place if the spacer moves forward.
Pete_89T2 is offline  
Old 04-01-19, 12:24 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (4)
 
lawless's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Crestview, Florida
Posts: 325
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Pete_89T2, This was the way I did it. It was more of a pain trying to figure out how to get the damn bolt out. No one makes a tool for this. I think it's recommended to remove the engine to replace the front cover gasket, though "doable" while still in the car. I've seen people trying to get these out with crazy powered impacts, etc...

Maybe I should CAD up a tool and throw it on our CNC at work. I think that would save a ton of people.
lawless is offline  
Old 04-01-19, 12:44 PM
  #5  
Rotary Madness
iTrader: (2)
 
rxtasy3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Spartanburg, SC
Posts: 7,546
Likes: 0
Received 64 Likes on 60 Posts
nope, didn't notice he said fd. so i'm guessing that the slave is a pull type?
rxtasy3 is offline  
Old 04-01-19, 02:41 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (4)
 
lawless's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Crestview, Florida
Posts: 325
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
By the way, the aluminum thermal end is not gnarled up. It's just a blurry picture with oil on the end so it looks chewed up. Again, I know this can be a tricky process, especially with the engine still in the car, so I just wanted to share how I did it because it worked so well.
lawless is offline  
Old 04-01-19, 03:28 PM
  #7  
Rotorhead for life
iTrader: (1)
 
Pete_89T2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Elkton, MD
Posts: 355
Likes: 0
Received 34 Likes on 28 Posts
Originally Posted by lawless View Post
By the way, the aluminum thermal end is not gnarled up. It's just a blurry picture with oil on the end so it looks chewed up. Again, I know this can be a tricky process, especially with the engine still in the car, so I just wanted to share how I did it because it worked so well.
No worries, but I'm not following what you did to prevent the risk of the Torrington bearing dropping out of place when you loosened up the E-shaft bolt. Since it's not an SA/FB/FC, the flooring the clutch trick won't work, so what did you rig up to push the FW forward & keep it there while removing the bolt? I see how your tool would keep the Eshaft from rotating to remove & reinstall the bolt, but that doesn't solve the T-bearing risk problem.
Pete_89T2 is offline  
Old 04-01-19, 06:13 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (4)
 
lawless's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Crestview, Florida
Posts: 325
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Originally Posted by Pete_89T2 View Post
No worries, but I'm not following what you did to prevent the risk of the Torrington bearing dropping out of place when you loosened up the E-shaft bolt. Since it's not an SA/FB/FC, the flooring the clutch trick won't work, so what did you rig up to push the FW forward & keep it there while removing the bolt? I see how your tool would keep the Eshaft from rotating to remove & reinstall the bolt, but that doesn't solve the T-bearing risk problem.
Wood door shims worked perfectly. The other end of the "tool" I made is braced up top so the motor won't turn and spit the shims out.
lawless is offline  
Old 04-02-19, 06:19 AM
  #9  
Rotorhead for life
iTrader: (1)
 
Pete_89T2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Elkton, MD
Posts: 355
Likes: 0
Received 34 Likes on 28 Posts
Originally Posted by lawless View Post
Wood door shims worked perfectly. The other end of the "tool" I made is braced up top so the motor won't turn and spit the shims out.
Gotcha, nice work!
Pete_89T2 is offline  
Old 04-21-19, 12:55 PM
  #10  
Junior Member
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: tempe, AZ
Posts: 16
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
so how would this be done on a 93 FD automatic? still have to wedge a block of wood in there?
braintumor is offline  
Old 04-25-19, 09:14 AM
  #11  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Tampa
Posts: 30
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
I'm confused by all of this. Is there any reason you couldn't just put the car in gear with the e-brake on to hold the e-shaft from spinning while you used a breaker bar and socket on the bolt?
strokercharged95gt is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Stefan13b
New Member RX-7 Technical
3
02-19-18 07:53 PM
Brian P
2nd Generation Specific (1986-1992)
33
01-20-05 12:22 AM
RX7WEEE
3rd Generation Specific (1993-2002)
18
09-03-04 02:08 AM
HEVNSNT
General Rotary Tech Support
9
11-14-02 05:01 PM


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: E-shaft bolt removal in car


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: