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Wheel studs and thread lock

Old 04-11-07, 01:08 PM
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Wheel studs and thread lock

On an SA/FB there are screw in type wheel stud instead of the press in you see on most cars. On my CSP autocross car I'm going to replace wheel studs pretty often (once a season) because of the strain there put under with constant wheel changes. Which kind of thread lock should I use? Blue or Red?
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Old 04-11-07, 01:25 PM
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I'd go with the strongest you can get your hands on.
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Old 04-11-07, 01:45 PM
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I've been running the same wheel studs since 2003 on an EP car running slicks, and I put them in with Loctite blue. I have the wheels off several times a day on a typical race week-end. Never had a problem.
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Old 04-12-07, 04:43 PM
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After I slathered the threads with RED loctite they never backed out. Don't just do a few drops, that ain't enough.

Could not hurt to peen over the end of the stud on the backside so it won't think of loosening.

If you're feeling the need, you can find standard press-in splined wheel studs and just hammer them into the hub from the backside.
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Old 04-14-07, 04:27 AM
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I don't understand the concern. Locktite red, peening the embedded end, destroying the threads with hammered press-in studs? Madness! Do you peen over the outside of the studs to keep the lug nuts from backing off? Do you slather the threads on your lugs with Locktite red so you will have to break out the propane torch every time you want to change tires? The Locktite is just a handy way to make some resistance to keep the stud from backing out when you are spinning off the lugs. Threaded fasteners that are torqued to spec stay where they are supposed to because the tension created in the stud exerts a large normal force to the threads. Normal force x coefficient of friction = secure wheel. Why do you think there is a torque spec for lug nuts?
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Old 04-16-07, 04:24 PM
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Concern is: A few drops of red loctite on hub threads was not enought to keep the stud in place. All 4 studs on drivers front came out while driving. After I completely covered hub threads with red loctite the stud never came out. Other 1st gen owners have peened or pressed in studs. Just passing on words of wisdom.
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Old 04-18-07, 11:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Boswoj
I don't understand the concern. Locktite red, peening the embedded end, destroying the threads with hammered press-in studs? Madness! Do you peen over the outside of the studs to keep the lug nuts from backing off? Do you slather the threads on your lugs with Locktite red so you will have to break out the propane torch every time you want to change tires? The Locktite is just a handy way to make some resistance to keep the stud from backing out when you are spinning off the lugs. Threaded fasteners that are torqued to spec stay where they are supposed to because the tension created in the stud exerts a large normal force to the threads. Normal force x coefficient of friction = secure wheel. Why do you think there is a torque spec for lug nuts?
sorry to be a dick but your wrong. the majority of what holds a lug tight is the friction between the countersunk flange on the wheel and the underside of the nut. also when removing a lug nut from a stud the friction between the nut and the stud may be greater then the friction between the stud and the hub in which case you may loosen the stud slightly when taking off the nut and not notice then put the nut back on thus leaving the stud not completley seated which can cause the stud to move under load either breaking it or allowing it to back out. Also as a side affect locktite also fills the gaps left due to the machining tolerances of threads thus making for less movement of the stud in the hub under load thus making it infinentley more resistent to fatigue. ...porsche has screw in studs on there 996 gt-3 and I have seen these back out during a 24hr even when they were green locktited in....I recomend you tig the back side in a few places.
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