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Race Techniques

Old 11-24-03, 06:21 PM
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Race Techniques

As I just got my first manual transmission vehicle, my Black/Tan '94 RX-7, I need advice on shifting, expecially for racing. I've heard talk of heel-toeing, can someone explain this to me?
Also, for a 3rd gen I've heard the best extra instrumentation to buy is a boost gauge and afuel pressure gauge, is this true also?
Any websites or advice on driving like a racer, please, let me know!
Thanks!!!
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Old 11-24-03, 09:23 PM
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Just some advice : if a 94 FD is your first manual car, learn to drive it regular first, it's qite a bit of car to handle. After that start with racing driving techniques, search this forum a bit there's been a few discussions. But start out small, your car'll thank you when it doesn't end up wrapped around a tree.
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Old 11-24-03, 09:33 PM
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Take you and your car to a driving school and learn to drive it in a controlled environment first if you want to screw around. Don't try and learn this stuff on the street, you'll wreck the car, yourself and/or others. It takes a while to get used to driving a stick with an underpowered "normal" car, let alone a twin-turbo sports car. Don't force it, learn slowly and apply until failure so you can see what the failure/breaking point is of yourself and the vehicle. By failure I mean traction/suspension, not gearbox

The other obvious alternative is to put vinyl graphics on your doors and you'll be shifting mad yo quick in no time with no effort whatsoever
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Old 11-27-03, 08:44 AM
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bump
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Old 11-27-03, 10:37 PM
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www.turnfast.com

EDIT: which happens to be DOWN or MISSING at the moment...but it's a very good site.

www.google.com and type in "heel toe" (not HEAL toe)
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Old 11-27-03, 11:41 PM
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Re: Race Techniques

Originally posted by TMarsland
As I just got my first manual transmission vehicle, my Black/Tan '94 RX-7, I need advice on shifting, expecially for racing. I've heard talk of heel-toeing, can someone explain this to me?
Heel-toeing is blipping the gas to match revs when downshifting under heavy braking. It can either be done with the left side of the pad of your foot on the brake pedal and rolling your foot over and blipping the throttle with the right side. Or, braking with the pad of your foot and blipping the throttle with the heel. Not an issue for normal driving, but under heavy braking, a downshift can lock up the rear wheels and upset the balance of the car. Downshifts should never be used to slow the car unless it's an emergency. Typically, they are to be complete just before turn-in.
This isn't something you shouldn't concern yourself with until you get become deft at shifting/driving. It's not imperative to heel-toe with a rotary anyhow. With it's minimal recipicating mass, it doesn't jolt the driveline like a piston engine.

Also, for a 3rd gen I've heard the best extra instrumentation to buy is a boost gauge and afuel pressure gauge, is this true also?
Consider the boost gauge a must have.

Any websites or advice on driving like a racer, please, let me know!
http://www.nasaproracing.com/hpde/index.html Look to the bottom of the page for info. Reading can only give you theory. You don't really learn until you've done it over, and over, and over, and over... then go back and do it again.
My advice, don't push too hard too fast. Resist the temptation to go out there and see what your new beast can do. Exploring the limits of an FD on public roads is a good way to get dead. Learn the basics then head off to your local autocross. Your first time there will make you realize how little you actually know. If you're nice enough, then the experienced autocrossers will teach you more then the internet ever could.

Thanks!!!
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Old 11-29-03, 09:08 AM
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Definitely learn to walk before you try to run. Get consistant on the street driving normally before you try heel-toeing, or trail braking etc. Make sure that you can handle the basics without thinking before you try to push it. That is a great car you have...you don't want to wreck it. You have a LONG time to learn how to be fast...take the time to learn how to be safe, or else your FD will be in the scrap heap and you will be in the hospital...or back in an automatic Civic which may be worse!
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Old 11-29-03, 09:23 AM
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lol, thanks all.
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